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Cloud Expo: Blog Feed Post

Is HTML5 Web 3.0?

Five years ago, someone told me that Web 3.0 would be about semantic Web. He was wrong.

About six years ago I wrote a blog titled “I have no idea what  Web 2.0 means“.  That blog had link to a video where IT leaders were helplessly trying to explain what Web 2.0 means. One guy said something like this, “Everyone wants to do it, and you can’t find enough people to do it”.  I still believe Web 2.0 was nothing else but a catchy marketing term, which helped selling such events as Web 2.0 Expo, Web 2.0 Summit, and helped Forrester in selling their typical 7-page-for-1000-bucks-zero-info reports (this one was quietly removed).

The Web 2.0 term is fully milked out and the IT world needs something else for the next big thing. HTML5 perfectly fits the bill. Make no mistake, HTML 5 is not simply a standard of a markup language that will be finalized by 2022 – this would be a hard sell. HTML5 means a set of technologies, techniques, styling elements, APIs, and mainly, JavaScript frameworks that are available now and being used for the development of the today’s Web applications.  It’s like Web 3.0: ”Everyone wants to do it, and you can’t find enough people to do it”.

Don’t fight the trend. Join the movement. If you are creating any framework or a product for the Web, ideally, stick the word HTML5 right into its title to help enterprise architects in justifying licensing this software. “See, it’s HTML5-compliant. Everybody does it.” If you can’t, make sure that your marketing brochures and white papers are heavily sprinkled with the HTML5 word.

Five years ago, someone told me that Web 3.0 would be about semantic Web. He was wrong. Web 3.0 is HTML5. The digit five in HTML5 means that this party will last for the next 5 years. Join the party!

P.S. If you didn’t know what HTML5 means before reading this blog and still have no clue, don’t get angry with me. I don’t know what it is either. Just tried to fantasize. Have you ever had Web fantasies? Me too.

More Stories By Yakov Fain

Yakov Fain is a co-founder of two software companies: Farata Systems and SuranceBay. He authored several technical books and lots of articles on software development. Yakov is Java Champion (https://java-champions.java.net). He leads leads Princeton Java Users Group. Two of Yakov's books will go in print this year: "Enterprise Web Development" (O'Reilly) and "Java For Kids" (No Starch Press).

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