SYS-CON MEDIA Authors: Greg Ness, Sean Houghton, Glenn Rossman, Ignacio M. Llorente, Xenia von Wedel

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The US Confectionery Market: What Consumers Eat and Why?

LONDON, Jan. 20, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com just published a new market research report:

The US Confectionery Market: What Consumers Eat and Why?

Product Synopsis

This report provides the results for the Confectionery market in the US from Canadean's unique, highly detailed of consumers' Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) consumption habits, and forms part of an overall series covering all CPG product markets. Its coverage includes, but is not limited to, consumption behaviors, the extent to which consumer trends influence their consumption, the value of the market these trends influence, and brand and private label choices as well as retailer choices. Much of this information can also be analyzed by specific consumer groups, providing hard and fast data on consumers and markets at the product category level.

Introduction and Landscape

Why was the report written?
Marketers in the Confectionery market face a major challenge. Understanding market size and segmentation is valuable, but the key to effective targeting is knowing just how valuable specific consumer groups are, and being able to quantify the impact of consumer trends. This data report solves these problems by providing survey-based data on consumer trends and consumer groups and market data that show the exact size of consumer groups, how much of the Confectionery market they account for, and which consumer trends drive their behavior.

What is the current market landscape and what is changing?
As consumer confidence increases proportionally to economic recovery, consumer trends will be directly affected. Since the global financial crisis of 2008-2009 the retail market has been characterized by an increase in the amount of discounted and own-brand products. Chocolate, Gum, and Sugar Confectionary are not considered essential items and therefore consumption patterns have been comparatively affected. The relatively weak US economy means it is essential to understand what pockets of growth might exist and whether they represent value or volume opportunities.

What are the key drivers behind recent market changes?
Consumers' uptake of products and the influence of consumer trends are fundamental causes of change in markets - making knowing what these trends are and the extent of their influence crucial. The survey-based data provided in this report examines over 20 consumer trends that affect the market and examines the share of consumption across 26 consumer groups. This data provides a detailed insight into exactly who the consumer is and just how much impact the latest consumer trends are having.

What makes this report unique and essential to read?
The data provided is unique in the market as it tracks consumer behavior through to its actual value impact on a product market. This provides readers with a unique data analysis of the market, allowing marketing tactics and strategy to be updated in line with the very latest consumer behaviors.

Key Features and Benefits

Consumer data, based upon proprietary surveys and then consumer group tracking and modeling for the following specific categories: chocolate, gum, and sugar confectionery.

Detailed consumer segmentation covering over 26 consumer groups, 20 consumer trends, and consumption frequency for each product category.

Consumer penetration for brands and private labels, based upon the original survey and then subsequent consumer tracking and modeling.

Unique retailer choice data at the product category level, based upon the original survey and then subsequent consumer tracking and modeling.

Key Market Issues

Females have a share of 56% of the US Confectionery market by value despite accounting for 51% of the population. This disproportionate consumption is heaviest in the Gum market, where females account for 63% of market by value.

Gum consumption peaks among Early Young Adults, after which it declines substantially as consumers get older, to the point where over 62% of Older Consumers are Non-users. This consumption pattern limits the number of premium products in the Gum market, with younger consumers typically recording the lowest levels of disposable income.

Not only do more females consume Sugar Confectionery than males, they do so more often; 15% of females are Heavy frequency consumers compared to 12% of males, while 31% of females are Light frequency users compared to 21% of males.

Key Highlights

Chocolate accounts for 56% of the US Confectionery market by value and 64% of the market by volume. Sugar Confectionery is the second-largest category, with a value market share thrice as large as Gum.

Private label penetration is low in the Confectionery market in the US, highest in the Sugar Confectionery product category at 3% of the volume of products distributed. Confectionery markets tend to be strongly brand-driven, with strong differentiation between products, which explains this low penetration.

Indulgence is the most important trend in the Confectionery market in the US, closely followed by Personal Space and Time. Not only do a large proportion of US consumers, particularly in the Chocolate product category, highlight that these consumer trends have an influence on their consumption, this translates into a significant proportion of actual value being directly influenced as well.

1 Introduction
1.1 What is this Report About?
1.2 Definitions
1.2.1 Consumer Trends
1.2.2 Consumer Groups
1.2.3 End Consumers
1.2.4 Volume Units and Aggregations
1.2.5 Population Profiles (for interpretation of tables and charts)
2 Methodology
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Initial data are based on a large scale, international, program of online consumer surveys
2.3 Demographic groups tracking provides time series data
3 Consumer Segmentation, Group Value and Trend Influence
3.1 Cohort Groups and Confectionery Market Value
3.1.1 Age Groups
3.1.2 Gender Groups
3.1.3 Location Groups
3.1.4 Education Achieved Groups
3.1.5 Wealth Groups
3.1.6 Busy Lives Groups
3.2 Cohort Groups and Market Value by Category
3.2.1 Chocolate
3.2.2 Gum
3.2.3 Sugar Confectionery
3.3 Behavioral Trends and Market Value
3.3.1 Chocolate
3.3.2 Gum
3.3.3 Sugar Confectionery
4 Consumption Analysis
4.1 Consumption Frequencies by Age and Gender
4.1.1 Chocolate
4.1.2 Gum
4.1.3 Sugar Confectionery
4.2 Consumer Profiles by Product Category
4.2.1 Chocolate
4.2.2 Gum
4.2.3 Sugar Confectionery
5 Brand vs. Private Label Uptake
5.1 Brand vs. Private Label Consumer Penetration
5.1.1 By Category
5.2 Confectionery Brand Choice and Private Label Consumer Penetration
5.2.1 Chocolate
5.2.2 Gum
5.2.3 Sugar Confectionery
6 The Share of Consumers Influenced by Trends
6.1 Trend Drivers of Consumers' Product Choices
6.1.1 Overall Confectionery
6.1.2 Chocolate
6.1.3 Gum
6.1.4 Sugar Confectionery
7 Consumption Impact: Market Valuation
7.1 Confectionery Value Impact of Consumer Consumption Behavior
7.1.1 Market Value by Category
7.1.2 Market Volume by Category
7.2 Confectionery Value Analysis by Category
7.2.1 Market Value by Category
7.2.2 Expenditure per Capita by Category
7.2.3 Expenditure per Household by Category
7.3 Confectionery Volume Impact of Consumer Behavior Trends
7.3.1 Market Volume by Category
7.3.2 Consumption per Capita by Category
7.3.3 Consumption Per Household by Category
8 Retailer Choice and Category Share
8.1 Retailer Volume Share
8.1.1 Retailer Volume Share in Confectionery
8.2 Retailer Volume Share by Category
8.2.1 Retail Share by Volume - Chocolate
8.2.2 Retail Share by Volume - Gum
8.2.3 Retail Share by Volume - Sugar Confectionery
8.3 Profiles of End-Consumers of Confectionery, by Retailer Used
8.3.1 Costco
8.3.2 Kroger
8.3.3 Publix
8.3.4 Safeway
8.3.5 Wal-Mart
8.3.6 Other
9 Appendix
9.1 About Canadean
9.2 Disclaimer

List of Tables

Table 1: Volume Units for the Confectionery Market
Table 2: United States Survey Respondent profile (weighted), 2012
Table 3: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Age Groups, 2012
Table 4: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Gender, 2012
Table 5: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Urban and Rural Dwellers, 2012
Table 6: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Education Level Achieved Groups, 2012
Table 7: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Wealth Groups, 2012
Table 8: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Busy Lives Groups, 2012
Table 9: United States Chocolate Consumer Group Share (% market value), 2012
Table 10: United States Gum Consumer Group Share (% market value), 2012
Table 11: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumer Group Share (% market value), 2012
Table 12: United States Total Chocolate Value (US Dollar millions) and Value Share Influenced by Behavioral Trends, 2012
Table 13: United States Total Gum Value (US Dollar millions) and Value Share Influenced by Behavioral Trends, 2012
Table 14: United States Total Sugar Confectionery Value (US Dollar millions) and Value Share Influenced by Behavioral Trends, 2012
Table 15: United States Chocolate Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group, by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 16: United States Chocolate Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 17: United States Gum Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group, by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 18: United States Gum Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 19: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group, by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 20: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Table 21: United States Chocolate Consumer Profiles (% consumers by sub-group), 2012
Table 22: United States Gum Consumer Profiles (% consumers by sub-group), 2012
Table 23: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumer Profiles (% consumers by sub-group), 2012
Table 24: United States Confectionery Private Label Consumer Penetration (% Consumers Using), by Category, 2012
Table 25: United States Chocolate Consumer Penetration of Survey-tracked Brands and Private Label (% Consumers Using), 2012
Table 26: United States Gum Consumer Penetration of Survey-tracked Brands and Private Label (% Consumers Using), 2012
Table 27: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumer Penetration of Survey-tracked Brands and Private Label (% Consumers Using), 2012
Table 28: United States Confectionery: Percentage of Consumers Stating that Specific Trends Influence Their Consumption, 2012
Table 29: United States Chocolate: Percentage of Consumers Stating that Specific Trends Influence Their Consumption, 2012
Table 30: United States Gum: Percentage of Consumers Stating that Specific Trends Influence Their Consumption, 2012
Table 31: United States Sugar Confectionery: Percentage of Consumers Stating that Specific Trends Influence Their Consumption, 2012
Table 32: United States Confectionery Market Value (US$ million), by Category, 2012
Table 33: United States Confectionery Market Volume (Kg m), by Category, 2012
Table 34: United States Confectionery Market Value (US$ million), by Category, 2012
Table 35: United States Confectionery Expenditure Per Capita (US$), by Category, 2012
Table 36: United States Confectionery Expenditure Per Household (US$), by Category
Table 37: United States Confectionery Market Volume (Kg m), by Category, 2012
Table 38: United States Confectionery Consumption Per Capita (Kg m / Population m), by Category, 2012
Table 39: United States Confectionery Consumption Per Household (Kg m / Households m), by Category, 2012
Table 40: United States Confectionery Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (% of Kg m), 2012
Table 41: United States Chocolate Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012
Table 42: United States Gum Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012
Table 43: United States Sugar Confectionery Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012
Table 44: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Costco (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012
Table 45: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Kroger (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012
Table 46: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Publix (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012
Table 47: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Safeway (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012
Table 48: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Wal-Mart (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012
Table 49: United States: Profile of Confectionery Consumers Whose Goods Mainly Come From Other (% by Subgroup, as tracked by the Survey), 2012

List of Figures

Figure 1: Consumer Trends Report Methodology
Figure 2: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Age Groups, 2012
Figure 3: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Gender, 2012
Figure 4: United States Confectionery Value Share (%), by Urban and Rural Dwellers, 2012
Figure 5: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Education Level Achieved Groups, 2012
Figure 6: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Wealth Groups, 2012
Figure 7: United States Confectionery Value Share (%) by Busy Lives Groups, 2012
Figure 8: United States Chocolate Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 9: United States Chocolate Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 10: United States Gum Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 11: United States Gum Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 12: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Age Group by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 13: United States Sugar Confectionery Consumption Frequency Analysis (% by Gender by Consumption Group), 2012
Figure 14: United States Confectionery Market Value (US$ million), by Category, 2012
Figure 15: United States Confectionery Expenditure Per Capita (US$), by Category, 2012
Figure 16: United States Confectionery Expenditure Per Household (US$), by Category
Figure 17: United States Confectionery Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (% of Kg m), 2012
Figure 18: United States Chocolate Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012
Figure 19: United States Gum Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012
Figure 20: United States Sugar Confectionery Survey-tracked Retailer Shares by Volume (Kg m), 2012

Companies Mentioned

Costco, Kroger, Publix, Safeway, Walmart

Read the full report:
The US Confectionery Market: What Consumers Eat and Why?
http://www.reportbuyer.com/food_drink/snacks/us_confectionery_market_consumers_eat_why_1.html#utm_source=prnewswire&utm_medium=pr&utm_campaign=Snack_and_Sweet

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: [email protected]  
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

SOURCE ReportBuyer

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