SYS-CON MEDIA Authors: Gilad Parann-Nissany, Srinivasan Sundara Rajan, Sean Houghton, Glenn Rossman, Ignacio M. Llorente

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Water for Power

LONDON, Feb. 13, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Reportbuyer.com just published a new market research report:

Water for Power


Overview

Water and power are inseparable. Water is the 'working fluid' for the thermal power industry – the largest industrial user of water in the world. So, it goes without saying that this growth will create huge global opportunities for the water sector - and we show you why the biggest opportunities will be in water and wastewater treatment.


On top of a growing demand for energy, stricter environmental regulations globally and increasing water scarcity will open up huge avenues of opportunity for the water and wastewater sector. The thermal power industry will invest increasingly in water and wastewater treatment and services (including such as chemicals, outsourcing and mobile treatment).

Water for Power will guide you through the best opportunities in water treatment and services for the fossil fuel and nuclear power industry – the report will investigate global trends and geographical market drivers; it will highlight the biggest growth regions and show you exactly how to break into these markets. We show you how the energy mix will shape future markets and affect investments, forecasting the best prospects for your business in this rapidly growing sector.

What does the report offer?

The demand for energy is set to accelerate and the water for power industry will be one of the fastest-growing markets over the next decade. This report is the definitive, global guide to the emerging opportunities in this sector, covering:
• Global market size and growth rates for water and wastewater treatment technologies and services (with a focus on chemicals, outsourcing and mobile treatment), so you can plan your involvement over the next 5 years
• Market player analysis – identify your potential partners and leading competitors and plan your market penetration strategies
• Technology trends – explaining current and future technology trends globally , so you can identify the best prospects for your business
• In-depth analysis of 3 key country markets – China, India and the USA – including country specific drivers, technology trends, procurement models and supply chain analysis, so you can successfully break into these market or maintain your presence
• Overview of regional markets – Analysis of how the development of new power plants affect the regional energy mix, market dynamics and future water treatment investments.

Opportunities in water for power

Find out why the big money is in water and wastewater treatment...

The biggest opportunities will be in water and wastewater technologies and solutions – capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment is set grow at an annual rate of 7.2% until 2018. A mixture of tightening regulations, water scarcity and increased demand make the power sector a very fertile market for both conventional and pioneering water and wastewater treatment technologies. We show you how an increasing challenging environment for the power generation industry is creating opportunities for international players with water and wastewater treatment solutions to break into new markets.

Opportunities

The supply of wastewater treatment equipment is the most rapidly growing area of the market. We focus on the opportunities in this area as well offering a complete guide to the best prospects for your water treatment technology or your chemical treatment, mobile water treatment and outsourcing services

FGD Wastewater treatment – flue gas desulphurisation technologies produce highly concentrated wastewater streams that simply have to be treated – especially in countries such as China where regulations are tightening. As a result, power plant operators are investing more and more in advanced wastewater treatment technologies. The report shows you where this is opening up opportunities for international players to capitalise on the inexperience of local companies, and exactly how international players can penetrate these markets.

Water reuse – Plant operators are coming under increased pressure to reduce their effect on the environment. Water reuse can reduce water withdrawals in areas experiencing water scarcity. In India, the use of ZLD technologies will see substantial growth to meet targets for water reuse in new power plants. We highlight opportunities for water treatment specialists to capitalise on these emerging trends and drivers.

Cooling system upgrades – once-through cooling systems place a significant strain on local water sources. Stricter regulations on discharge in countries like the USA mean that this is no longer a sustainable strategy. The report will investigate how and where tightening regulations will encourage water reuse in the cooling system and investment in more advanced water treatment, so you can keep ahead of your competitors in capitalising on these emerging opportunities.

Chemical Treatment – the shift towards advanced treatment systems and recirculating will drive the chemical treatment market. Cooling towers require greater control of water chemistry than once-through systems and water and wastewater treatment systems require chemical feeds to make sure they operate efficiently – so there will be huge new avenues of opportunity for suppliers of water treatment chemicals. The report analyses how chemicals are bought and sold in different markets, showing you how you can enter each individual supply chain.

Outsourcing – Power plant operators are increasingly considering the option to outsource the operation of their water treatment systems to focus on what they do the best – generating electricity. Water companies have the opportunity to bring their greater system knowledge to deliver financial savings to the power sector. This report assesses the opportunities for outsourcing in the global arena.

Mobile water treatment systems – There will be an increased demand for temporary water treatment systems in case of emergencies, during scheduled maintenance to existing systems, and as an alternative to conventional water treatment systems. This report analyses the potential for temporary water treatment, and identifies the leading players in this rapidly developing market.

Geographical coverage

This report offers a global guide to the opportunities for the water and wastewater sector in the power industry. For each region, it offers an overview of the energy mix, market drivers, forecasted investment and future projects.

The report focuses on the three countries where we see the greatest opportunities – India, China and the USA. We analyse the unique trends and drivers in each country, supply chains and procurement models, key players and market opportunities, as well as providing a forecast of projected investments.

Country chapters
China
India
United States

Regional chapters
Europe
MENA

Regional snapshots
Americas
Rest of Asia
Sub-Saharan Africa

Market Drivers

Water Scarcity – This is the biggest driver for water and wastewater technologies. Power plants globally face restricted water resources, so there are huge opportunities for businesses that can offer solutions for higher reuse rates. From ZLD to desalination, we show you the biggest opportunities for your technologies in the global market.
Regulations – The need to reduce the environmental impact of the power industry is a major driver. Pollutants that are released during the burining of fossil fuels must be scrubbed from waste gases. This creates a very concentrated wastestream that must be treated before discharge, requiring upgrades to exsiting systems and the adoption of specialist technology in new power plants. We show you the countries most affected by these regulations, so you can identify regions that have a need for your solutions.
Economic development and industrialisation – thermal generating capacity is increasing rapidly in emerging economies and driving investment in process water treatment in these areas. We identify the regions offering the best prospects for water and wastewater treatment and give you strategies for breaking into these markets, so you can expand your business into the most lucrative markets ahead of your competitors.

How to access the market

Water for Power gives you invaluable advice from industry insiders on how to do business in the three biggest markets – India, China and the USA.
By interviewing experts who have concrete experience in that country, we reveal how the market works in practice and give you strategies to guarantee success in each country.

The report offers:
• Analysis of procurement processes and market penetration strategies
• Supply chain analysis
• A list of key market players and who your potential partners or competitors will be
• Possible ways to enter the supply chain alongside the dominant market players

Who should read this report?

Equipment suppliers and major water companies – understand the current and future trends in water and wastewater treatment technologies used to identify new market opportunities. The report includes an overview of how water and wastewater systems for power plants are procured in the 3 key markets allowing you to adapt your business strategy and capitalise on emerging opportunities.

Chemical suppliers – understand how regulations are driving the demand for more environmentally friendly chemicals trends. The report investigates how market drivers are creating opportunities for your business and guides you through the most successful strategies for selling your products to power plant operators.

Investors and financiers – identify the best investment opportunities in this growing market. Understand how the market works and the regions with the greatest prospects.

Consultants – fully understand the market, the business prospects it offers for your clients and how to successfully capitalise on these emerging opportunities.


Publication information ii

Executive summary iii

Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment in the power industry, 2013 iii
Regional markets iv
Market forecast for water and wastewater treatment in the power industry by region, 2011-2018 iv
Services v
Global market for water treatment chemicals and services in the power industry, 2013 v
Global market forecast for mobile water services in the power industry by region, 2011-2018 vi

1. Introduction to power generation 1

1.1 Boiler, turbine and generator systems 1
Figure 1.1 Water use and treatment processes in the steam cycle 1
1.1.1 Steam cycle variations 2
Figure 1.2 Temperature and pressure of boilers at thermal power plants 2
1.1.2 Gas turbines and the combined cycle 3
Figure 1.3 Water use and electricity generation in a combined cycle power plant 4
1.1.3 Nuclear reactors 4
Figure 1.4 Water use and treatment needs in a pressurised water reactor 5
1.2 Cooling systems 6
Figure 1.5 Operating characteristics of once through, recirculating and dry cooling 6
1.2.1 Water treatment needs 7
Figure 1.6 Water treatment processes in a recirculating cooling system 7
1.3 Reducing emissions 8
1.3.1 Sulphur dioxide 8
Figure 1.7 Limestone addition removes sulphur dioxide from flue gas 8
1.3.2 Particulate emissions 8
1.3.3 Carbon dioxide 9
1.4 Concentrating solar power 9
Figure 1.8 Breakdown of operational CSP plants & those under construction, contract or development, 2013 9
1.4.1 Water consumption in CSP plants 10
1.4.1.1 CSP technologies 10
Figure 1.9 Planned CSP technologies in the world, 2013 10
1.4.1.2 Water consumption 10
Figure 1.10 Water consumption in CSP plants 10
Cooling water 11
Process water 11
Wastewater 11

2. Global trends 13

2.1 Future fuel use and power plant construction 13
Figure 2.1 Global installed generating capacity by fuel type, 2005–2035 13
Figure 2.2 Global additional generating capacity by fuel type, 2013–2018 13
Figure 2.3 Regional installed generating capacity by fuel type, 2013 14
2.1.1 Coal-fired power plants 14
Figure 2.4 Annual additional generating capacity of new coal-fired power plants by region, 1970–2018 15
Figure 2.5 Additional generating capacity of new coal-fired power plants by region, 2013–2018 15
2.1.2 Gas-fired power plants 16
Figure 2.6 Additional generating capacity of new gas-fired power plants by region, 2013–2018 16
Figure 2.7 Annual additional generating capacity of new gas-fired power plants by region, 1970–2018 16
Figure 2.8 Cost of fossil fuels for power generation in the United States, 1990–2013 17
2.1.2.1 Generating systems in gas-fired power plants 17
Figure 2.9 Growth in generating capacity of gas-fired power plants by generating system, 2005–2018 17
2.1.3 Oil-fired power plants 18
Figure 2.10 Annual additional generating capacity of new gas-, coal- and oil-fired power plants, 1970–2018 18
2.1.4 Nuclear power plants 18
Figure 2.11 Annual additional generating capacity of nuclear power plants by region, 1970–2018 18
2.1.5 Global trends for different processes within coal-fired power plants 19
2.1.5.1 Cooling systems 19
Figure 2.12 Installed generating capacity of coal-fired power plants by cooling system type, 2013 19
2.1.5.2 Fly ash handling systems 20
Figure 2.13 Installed generating capacity of coal-fired power plants by fly ash handling system type, 2013 20
2.1.5.3 Flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) systems 20
Figure 2.14 FGD systems installed globally at coal-fired power plants by system type, 2013 20
2.2 Water use in thermal power plants 21
2.2.1 Water withdrawal at thermal power plants 21
Figure 2.15 Water withdrawal and consumption factors for different types of power plant 21
Figure 2.16 Estimated water withdrawal by forecast region in 2012 and 2018 22
Figure 2.17 Water withdrawal and generating capacity of thermal power plants by cooling system 23
Figure 2.18 Estimated water withdrawal by fuel type and cooling system, 2012 23
Figure 2.19 Installed generating capacity of thermal power plants with once through cooling systems by plant type, and water withdrawal for each region, 2012 24
2.2.2 Water consumption at thermal power plants 24
Figure 2.20 Regional breakdown of water consumption by thermal power plants in 2012 and 2018 25
Figure 2.21 Estimated water consumption by fuel type and cooling system, 2012 25
Figure 2.22 Total installed generating capacity of thermal power plants by cooling system type, and
water consumption for each region, 2012 26
2.3 Market drivers 27
2.3.1 Water scarcity 27
2.3.2 Environmental regulations 27
2.3.3 New power plant constructions and utilisation of existing assets 27
2.4 Technology treatment trains and trends in the power industry 28
Figure 2.23 Water systems in power plants 28
2.4.1 Demineralisation technologies 28
Figure 2.24 Treatment train for boiler feedwater 29
2.4.2 Cooling tower makeup water 29
2.4.3 Wastewater treatment technologies 30
2.4.3.1 Boiler and cooling water blowdown treatment 30
2.4.3.2 FGD wastewater treatment 30
Figure 2.25 Physical-chemical treatment train for FGD wastewater 31
2.4.3.3 Zero liquid discharge (ZLD) 31
Figure 2.26 Zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system 32
Figure 2.27 Number of ZLD systems for treating FGD wastewater, by major supplier 32
Figure 2.28 Number of ZLD systems for treating power plant blowdown supplied by Aquatech 32
2.5 Market forecast 33
Figure 2.29 Worldwide capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011–2018 33
Figure 2.30 Capital expenditure and expected growth rates by region, 2013-2018 34
2.5.1 Market division and segmentation 34
Figure 2.31 Worldwide capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011–2018 35
Figure 2.32 Worldwide capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 37
2.6 Market players 38
2.6.1 Power plant operators 38
Figure 2.33 Top 20 power plant operators in the world by capacity 38
2.6.2 Consulting engineers 38
Figure 2.34 Top 10 consulting engineers in the world by revenues from the power sector 38
2.6.3 EPC contractors 39
Figure 2.35 Top 20 EPC contractors in the power industry by capacity, worldwide 39
2.6.4 Water technology companies 39
Figure 2.36 Major global water technology companies in the power sector 40
2.6.5 Equipment suppliers 41
Figure 2.37 Equipment suppliers in the power industry 41

3. United States 43

3.1 Market drivers 43
3.2 Market overview 43
3.2.1 Power generating capacity 43
Figure 3.1 Power generating capacity in the U.S. by fuel type, 1980–2018 44
3.2.2 Water treatment indicators 44
Figure 3.2 Types of cooling system installed at thermal power plants, 2013 44
Figure 3.3 Techniques used to mitigate the emission of sulphur dioxide from coal-fired plants, 2013 45
3.3 Regulations 45
3.3.1 Steam electric power generating effluent guidelines (Steam Electric ELGs) – 40CFR Part 423 45
3.3.1.1 Proposed regulatory options 46
Figure 3.4 The EPA's preferred regulatory options and treatment methods for existing power plants 46
Figure 3.5 Preferred regulatory options for new power plants 47
Figure 3.6 Estimated compliance costs for U.S. power plants discharging FGD wastewater 47
3.3.2 Cooling water intake structures – CWA 316b 48
3.3.3 Impaired waters and Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) regulations – CWA 303d 48
3.4 Technology trends and opportunities 48
3.4.1 Water treatment trends 48
3.4.2 Wastewater treatment trends 48
3.4.2.1 Biological treatment 49
3.4.2.2 Ion exchange (IX) 49
3.4.2.3 Adsorptive media 49
3.4.2.4 Thermal evaporators 49
3.4.3 Leachate treatment 49
3.4.4 Water reuse practices 49
3.4.5 New technology and process needs 50
3.5 Procurement process 50
3.5.1 Procurement models 50
3.5.2 Bidding process 51
Figure 3.7 Water treatment packages 51
3.5.3 Choice of equipment 51
3.5.4 Evaluation criteria 51
3.6 Supply chain analysis 52
Figure 3.8 Major consulting engineering and contractor firms in the power sector by revenue, 2012 52
3.6.1 Equipment suppliers 52
Figure 3.9 Major equipment suppliers in the United States 52
3.7 Market analysis 53
3.7.1 Historical investments in generating capacity 53
Figure 3.10 Value of construction put in place on projects in the U.S. power generation sector, 2003–2012 53
Figure 3.11 Estimated value of construction at new steam power plants in the United States, 2003–2012 54
3.7.2 Available capacity and future projects 54
Figure 3.12 Planned additions to fossil fuel and nuclear generating capacity by state, 2013-2018 54
Figure 3.13 Total capacity factor at fossil fuel and nuclear power plants in the United States, 1990-2011 55
3.7.3 Market forecast 55
Figure 3.14 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011–2018 55
Figure 3.15 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 56
Figure 3.16 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 57

4. China 59

4.1 Market overview 59
Figure 4.1 Current installed power generation capacity by fuel type, 2013 59
4.2 Market drivers 59
4.2.1 Water scarcity 60
Figure 4.2 Overlap between current and future power plants and water scarce areas 60
4.2.2 Environmental regulation 61
4.2.2.1 Water conservation policies 61
4.2.2.2 Water reuse requirements 61
4.2.2.3 Air pollution regulation and FGD wastewater discharge standards 62
Figure 4.3 Currently installed coal-fired capacity broken down by FGD system type 62
4.3 Technology trends 63
4.4 Procurement process 63 x
4.5 Supply chain analysis 64
Figure 4.4 Top 10 power plant operators by capacity 64
4.6 Market opportunities 65
4.6.1 Coal-to-CTX 65
4.6.1.1 Coal-to-olefin (CTO) 66
4.6.1.2 Coal-to-liquids (CTL) 66
4.6.1.3 Coal-to-monoethylene glycol (CT-MEG) 66
4.6.1.4 Coal-to-synthetic natural gas (CT-SNG) 66
4.6.1.5 Coal-to-dimethyl ether (CT-DME) 66
4.6.1.6 Current and future projects 67
Figure 4.5 Current coal-to-CTX projects 67
Figure 4.6 Future CTO projects 68
Figure 4.7 Future CT-MEG projects 69
Figure 4.8 Future CTL projects 70
Figure 4.9 Future CT-SNG projects 70
4.7 Market analysis 71
4.7.1 Investments in generating capacity 71
Figure 4.10 Historical and planned investments in thermal power in China, 2008–2020 71
4.7.2 Waste gas treatment and environmental protection 71
4.7.3 Market forecast 71
Figure 4.11 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 72
Figure 4.12 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 72
Figure 4.13 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 73

5. India 75

5.1 Market overview 75
5.1.1 Overview of India's current and future new power generating capacity 75
Figure 5.1 Current and future power generation installed capacity by fuel type, 2013 and 2018 75
Figure 5.2 Total installed capacity by end user 76
5.2 Market drivers 76
5.2.1 Water scarcity and environmental regulation 76
5.2.1.1 Water allocation under increasing water scarcity 76
Figure 5.3 Overlap between water scarcity and thermal power plant locations 77
5.2.1.2 Use of alternative water supply options 77
5.2.1.3 Water reuse requirements 78
5.2.1.4 Air pollution regulation 78
5.2.1.5 Wastewater discharge limits 78
5.3 Technology trends 78
5.4 Procurement process for new power plant projects 79
5.4.1 Overview of the procurement process 79
5.4.1.1 Tendering practices 79
5.4.1.2 Project specification and prequalification process 79
5.4.1.3 Bid evaluation 80
5.4.2 Procurement in practice 80
5.5 Supply chain analysis 80
5.5.1 Power generation companies 80
Figure 5.4 Top 10 power plant operating companies in India by installed capacity 81
5.5.2 General power plant contractors 81
5.5.3 Consulting engineers 81
5.5.4 Companies active in the water for power market 81
5.6 Market opportunities 82
5.6.1 Accessing the market 82
5.7 Market analysis 82
5.7.1 Investments in generating capacity 82
Figure 5.5 Investments in new thermal power stations in India, 2003-2012 83
Figure 5.6 Public and private sector investments in the Indian power industry, 2003-2012 83
5.7.2 Project delays and coal supply problems 84
Figure 5.7 Contracted and installed capacity in the Indian thermal power sector, 2003-2012 84
5.7.3 Market forecast 84 xi
Figure 5.8 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 85
Figure 5.9 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 85
Figure 5.10 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 86

6. Regional snapshots 87

6.1 Europe 87
6.1.1 Overview of different types of power plant 87
Figure 6.1 Installed generating capacity in the Europe region by fuel type, 1980–2018 87
Figure 6.2 Additional generating capacity in Europe by fuel type, 2013–2018 88
Figure 6.3 Installed and additional generating capacity in Europe by fuel type, 2013–2018 88
Figure 6.4 Additional generating capacity of renewable energy power plants by fuel type, 2013–2018 89
6.1.1.1 Gas-fired power plants 89
Figure 6.5 Additional gas-fired generating capacity in selected European countries, 2005–2018 89
Figure 6.6 Additional gas-fired generating capacity in Europe by country, 2013–2018 90
Figure 6.7 Use of combined cycle gas turbines in Europe's additional gas-fired generating capacity 90
6.1.1.2 Coal-fired power plants 91
Figure 6.8 Additional coal-fired generating capacity in Europe by country, 2013–2018 91
Figure 6.9 Annual additional coal-fired generating capacity in selected countries in Europe, 2005–2018 91
6.1.1.3 Nuclear power plants 92
Figure 6.10 Additional nuclear-powered generating capacity in Europe by country, 2013–2018 92
6.1.2 Market overview 92
6.1.2.1 Market drivers 92
6.1.2.2 Future opportunities 93
6.1.2.3 Procurement 93
6.1.3 Market forecast 94
Figure 6.11 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 94
Figure 6.12 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 94
Figure 6.13 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 95
6.1.4 Future power plant projects 96
Figure 6.14 Additional generating capacity in Europe by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 96
Figure 6.15 Additional generating capacity for different countries in Europe by fuel type, 2013–2018 97
6.1.4.1 Russian Federation 97
Figure 6.16 Installed and additional generating capacity in the Russian Federation by fuel type, 2013–2018 97
Figure 6.17 Annual additional generating capacity in the Russian Federation by fuel type, 2005–2018 98
6.1.4.2 United Kingdom 98
Figure 6.18 Installed generating capacity in the UK by fuel type, 2000–2018 98
Figure 6.19 Installed and additional generating capacity in the United Kingdom by fuel type, 2013–2018 99
6.1.4.3 Germany 99
Figure 6.20 Installed and additional generating capacity in Germany by fuel type, 2013–2018 99
Figure 6.21 Annual additional generating capacity in Germany by fuel type, 2005–2018 100
6.1.4.4 Poland 100
Figure 6.22 Installed generating capacity in Poland by fuel type, 2013 100
Figure 6.23 Installed and additional generating capacity in Poland by fuel type, 2013–2018 101
Figure 6.24 Annual additional generating capacity in Poland by fuel type, 2005–2018 101
6.2 Middle East / North Africa 102
6.2.1 Overview of different types of power plant 102
Figure 6.25 Additional generating capacity in the MENA region by fuel type, 2013–2018 102
Figure 6.26 Installed and additional generating capacity in the MENA region by fuel type, 2013–2018 102
Figure 6.27 Annual additional generating capacity of thermal power plants by fuel type, 2005–2018 103
6.2.1.1 Coal-fired power plants 103
6.2.1.2 Gas-fired power plants 104
Figure 6.28 Annual additional gas-fired generating capacity in the MENA region by country, 2005–2018 104
Figure 6.29 Additional gas-fired generating capacity in the MENA region by country, 2013–2018 104
6.2.1.3 Oil-fired power plants 105
Figure 6.30 Additional oil-fired generating capacity in the MENA region by country, 2013–2018 105
Figure 6.31 Annual additional oil-fired generating capacity in Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Jordan, 2005–2018 105
6.2.1.4 Nuclear power plants 105
6.2.1.5 Co-located desalination and power plants 105
Figure 6.32 Installed generating capacity of co-located desalination and power plants by country, 2012 106
6.2.2 Market overview 106
6.2.2.1 Future opportunities 106
6.2.2.2 Procurement 107
6.2.3 Market forecast 107
Figure 6.33 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 107
Figure 6.34 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 108
Figure 6.35 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 108
6.2.4 Future power plant projects 109
Figure 6.36 Additional generating capacity in the MENA region by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 109
Figure 6.37 Additional generating capacity in the MENA region by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 110
6.2.4.1 Saudi Arabia 110
Figure 6.38 Annual additional generating capacity in Saudi Arabia by fuel type, 2005–2018 110
6.2.4.2 Turkey 111
Figure 6.39 Installed generating capacity in Turkey by fuel type, 2000–2018 111
Figure 6.40 Installed and additional generating capacity in the MENA region by fuel type, 2013–2018 111
6.2.4.3 Egypt 112
6.2.4.4 Iraq 112
Figure 6.41 Installed and additional generating capacity in Iraq by fuel type, 2013–2018 112
6.3 Rest of Americas 113
6.3.1 Overview of different types of power plant 113
Figure 6.42 Additional generating capacity in the Rest of Americas region by fuel type, 2013–2018 113
Figure 6.43 Installed & additional generating capacity by fuel type, 2013–2018 113
Figure 6.44 Annual additional thermal generating capacity in the Rest of Americas by fuel type, 2005–2018 114
6.3.1.1 Gas-fired power plants 114
Figure 6.45 Additional gas-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Americas region by country, 2013–2018 114
Figure 6.46 Annual additional gas-fired generating capacity in Mexico, Canada, Brazil & Venezuela 115
6.3.1.2 Coal-fired power plants 115
Figure 6.47 Additional coal-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Americas region by country, 2013–2018 115
Figure 6.48 Annual additional coal-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Americas by country, 2005–2018 116
6.3.1.3 Oil-fired power plants 116
Figure 6.49 Additional oil-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Americas region by country, 2013–2018 116
Figure 6.50 Annual additional oil-fired generating capacity in Peru, Mexico and Brazil, 2005–2018 117
6.3.2 Market forecast 117
Figure 6.51 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 117
Figure 6.52 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 118
Figure 6.53 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 118
6.3.3 Future power plant projects 119
Figure 6.54 Additional generating capacity by selected country and fuel type, 2013–2018 119
Figure 6.55 Additional generating capacity by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 119
6.4 Rest of Asia 120
6.4.1 Overview of different types of power plant 120
Figure 6.56 Additional generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by fuel type, 2013–2018 120
Figure 6.57 Installed and additional generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by fuel type, 2013–2018 120
Figure 6.58 Annual additional generating capacity of thermal power plants by fuel type, 2005–2018 121
6.4.1.1 Coal-fired power plants 121
Figure 6.59 Additional coal-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by country, 2013–2018 121
Figure 6.60 Annual additional coal-fired generating capacity by country, 2005–2018 122
6.4.1.2 Gas-fired power plants 122
Figure 6.61 Additional gas-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by country, 2013–2018 122
Figure 6.62 Annual additional gas-fired generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by country, 2005-2018 123
6.4.1.3 Nuclear power plants 123
Figure 6.63 Additional nuclear-powered generating capacity by country, 2013–2018 123
6.4.2 Market forecast 124
Figure 6.64 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 124
Figure 6.65 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 124
Figure 6.66 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 125
6.4.3 Future power plant projects 126
Figure 6.67 Additional generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 126
Figure 6.68 Additional generating capacity in the Rest of Asia region by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 126 xiii
6.4.3.1 Vietnam 127
Figure 6.69 Vietnam's energy mix, 2013 and 2018 127
6.4.3.2 Republic of Korea 128
Figure 6.70 Installed generating capacity in the Republic of Korea by fuel type, 1980–2018 128
6.4.3.3 Indonesia 129
Figure 6.71 Installed generating capacity in Indonesia by fuel type, 2008–2018 129
6.5 Sub-Saharan Africa 130
6.5.1 Overview of different types of power plant 130
Figure 6.72 Additional generating capacity in the Sub-Saharan Africa region by fuel type, 2013–2018 130
Figure 6.73 Installed & additional generating capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa by fuel type, 2013–2018 130
Figure 6.74 Annual additional thermal generating capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa by fuel type, 2005–2018 131
6.5.1.1 Coal-fired power plants 131
Figure 6.75 Additional coal-fired generating capacity in Sub-Saharan Africa by country, 2013–2018 131
Figure 6.76 Annual additional coal-fired generating capacity in selected countries, 2010–2018 132
6.5.1.2 Gas-fired power plants 132
Figure 6.77 Additional gas-fired generating capacity by country, 2013–2018 132
Figure 6.78 Annual additional gas-fired generating capacity in selected countries, 2005–2018 133
6.5.1.3 Oil-fired power plants 133
Figure 6.79 Additional oil-fired generating capacity in the Sub-Saharan Africa region by country, 2013–2018 133
6.5.2 Market forecast 134
Figure 6.80 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment, 2011-2018 134
Figure 6.81 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by system, 2011-2018 134
Figure 6.82 Capital expenditure on water and wastewater treatment by equipment, 2011–2018 135
6.5.3 Future power plant projects 136
Figure 6.83 Additional generating capacity by selected country and fuel type, 2013–2018 136
Figure 6.84 Additional generating capacity by country and fuel type, 2013–2018 136

7. Services 137

7.1 Outsourcing 137
7.1.1 Mobile water market 138
7.1.1.1 Market drivers for mobile water 138
7.1.1.2 Market trends: Technologies 139
Figure 7.1 Main treatment technologies in mobile water units 139
7.1.1.3 Market trends: Application of RO versus IX 139
7.1.1.4 Market trends: Market players 139
Figure 7.2 Major mobile water market players and their market share in the power sector 140
Figure 7.3 Mobile water market players by technology provided in mobile water units 140
7.1.1.5 Market trends: Entry to the mobile water market 140
7.1.1.6 Market trends: Procurement process for mobile water service 141
7.1.1.7 Market trends: Cost of mobile water service 141
7.1.1.8 Market forecast 142
Figure 7.4 Global market forecast for mobile water services in the power industry by region, 2011-2018 142
Figure 7.5 Estimated value of mobile water services by market by contract type, 2013-2018 142
7.1.2 Outsourcing contracts 142
7.1.2.1 Market drivers 143
7.1.2.2 Procurement of outsourcing contracts 143
7.1.3 Outsourcing markets: Mobile water and BOO 144
7.1.3.1 United States 144
7.1.3.2 Europe 144
7.1.3.3 Asia Pacific 144
7.1.3.4 MENA 145
7.2 Chemicals 146
7.2.1 Boiler water treatment 146
7.2.1.1 Phosphate-based treatment programs 147
Figure 7.6 Concentration limits for phosphate and alkalinity at increasing pressure 147
7.2.1.2 All-volatile treatment programs 147
7.2.1.3 Chemical suppliers and costs 148
Figure 7.7 Chemical cost associated with a phosphate-based treatment program 148
7.2.2 Cooling water treatment 148 xiv
Figure 7.8 Operating parameters of recirculating cooling systems defined by cycles of concentration 149
7.2.2.1 Biocide treatment 149
7.2.2.2 Specialty scale and corrosion inhibitors 149
7.2.2.3 Chemical suppliers and costs 150
Figure 7.9 Increased specialty chemical treatment costs for cooling towers using reclaimed wastewater 151
7.2.3 Process water and wastewater treatment 151
7.2.3.1 Chemical suppliers and costs 151
7.2.4 Supply chain 152
Figure 7.10 Estimated market share of service companies in the global power industry, 2013 153
7.2.5 Market forecast 154
Figure 7.11 Global forecast of expenditure on commodity and specialty chemicals, 2011–2018 154
Figure 7.12 Global expenditure on chemical treatment by system, 2011–2018 155
Figure 7.13 Global expenditure on chemical treatment by product category, 2011–2018 155

Interviewees 157

References 159



Read the full report:
Water for Power
http://www.reportbuyer.com/energy_utilities/water/water_power.html#utm_s...

For more information:
Sarah Smith
Research Advisor at Reportbuyer.com
Email: [email protected]
Tel: +44 208 816 85 48
Website: www.reportbuyer.com

 

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