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Low Temperature Laundry Campaign to Target Youth Audience

MANCHESTER, England, March 4, 2014 /PRNewswire/ --

The recently launched 'I Prefer 30' low temperature wash campaign has just signed up The National Union of Students as one of its partners.

The campaign, launched to consumers in 2014, is an initiative of detergent companies and supporters to encourage consumers to do their domestic laundry at lower temperatures. It already has the support of consumer goods partners including Unilever, P&G, Beko, Electrolux/AEG and Ikea, as well as campaigning organisations Global Action Plan, the Energy Saving Trust, AMFEP, CLASS and corporate supporters DuPont and Novozymes.

Dom Anderson, NUS Vice President of Society and Citizenship said: "With the average student spending over £500 per year on their energy usage, we're delighted to support the 'I prefer 30' campaign to help raise awareness of how students can save money on their energy usage while doing their bit for the environment as well."

UKCPI (UK Cleaning Products Industry Association) who is behind the UK campaign sees the sign up of the NUS as a major coup.

Philip Malpass, Director General of UKCPI said: "By adopting 'I prefer 30' not only can you make energy savings, and therefore financial ones, by washing at lower temperatures but you can prolong the life of your clothes."

The new partner addition to the UK campaign coincides with Climate Week: if everyone reduced their laundry wash temperature by just 3° that would be the equivalent of removing 127,000 UK cars from the road.

The campaign is not targeting commercial and industrial cleaning processes. Consumers are invited to get handy washing advice at http://www.iprefer30.eu/en

Key Facts

• Within the five campaign countries (Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy & UK), the UK (with 115,6 kWh/hh/yr) and Italy (112,7 kWh/ hh/yr) have the highest 'per capita' energy consumption for washing.*

• A reduction of the current average wash temperature by 3°C in the 5 campaign countries could reduce the energy consumption for laundry washing by 1065 GWh/yr. This corresponds to 11.7% of the current total of 9129,5 GWh/yr; it is also the electricity consumption of a city of more than 140000 inhabitants in a year! (Ref. Exceltys, 2013).**

• The CO2 emissions from energy use in washing and drying clothes in UK are equivalent to around 10% of the total CO2 emissions from cars across the UK.***

• UK: average number of washes per week: four; average wash temperature 39°C; washes at 30° C or below: only 32.3%; annual laundry energy use per household: 115.6 kWh; potential savings (wash T reduced by 3°C): 20.1%.**

* Source: Destasis 2007

** Source: Insites for AISE - 2011 data, Stamminger survey - 2013

*** Source; WRAP, Valuing our clothes, 2012

Notes to Editors

The campaign is headed by AISE (International Association for Soaps, Detergents and Maintenance Products) and it is running in five countries: Belgium, Denmark, France, Italy and UK. The environmental campaign is being managed in the UK by UKCPI and will feature in magazine ads, web ads and Point of Sale material at participating outlets in the coming months.

UKCPI is the leading trade association representing UK producers of cleaning and hygiene products - from soaps, washing powders and liquids, household disinfectants, air care and polishes, to the professional cleaning and hygiene products used in industrial and institutional applications.
http://www.ukcpi.org

AISE, the International Association for Soaps, Detergents and Maintenance Products, is the official representative body of this industry in Europe. Membership totals 29 national associations across Europe and beyond. http://www.aise.eu

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