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Two-Thirds of Canadian Parents Uncertain Their Kids Will Fulfill the Hopes They Have for Them

More than 80 per cent unsure they fulfilled their own parents' aspirations.

TORONTO, ONTARIO -- (Marketwired) -- 03/04/14 -- Editors Note: There are three (3) videos associated with this press release.

When it comes to parents' hopes for their children, it seems that disappointment is passed down from generation to generation.

Two-thirds (67 per cent) of Canadian parents are uncertain that their children will fulfill their hopes, according to a new national survey commissioned by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC) and Invesco Canada Ltd. Moreover, 83 per cent of parents are unsure that they achieved the aspirations their own parents had for them.

BARRIERS TO ACHIEVING ASPIRATIONS

The poll identified a number of barriers to achieving parental hopes:


--  negative emotional states or behaviours (29 per cent)
--  family financial situation (18 per cent)
--  stress at home (17 per cent)
--  difficulty in school (15 per cent)

VALUES AND CONFIDENCE, TOP LIST OF PARENTAL HOPES

The poll asked parents to list the hopes and expectations that they deem as very important for their children to achieve. Here are the top 10 answers:


1.  87 per cent want their children to have the values needed to make good
    decisions
2.  85 per cent want their children to have the confidence to pursue their
    dreams
3.  77 per cent want their children to get a job that they love
4.  69 per cent want their children to experience the joy of personal
    freedom
5.  66 per cent want their children to be generous and giving towards others
6.  59 per cent want their children to be free from money worries
7.  56 per cent want their children to be highly successful in their chosen
    career
8.  49 per cent want their children to achieve academic success
9.  46 per cent want their children to have their own unique style
10. 44 per cent want their children to help make their community a better
    place

UNFINISHED BUSINESS

Some of the poll's findings suggest many parents have unfinished business with their kids. Four-in-10 adults (41 per cent) want their children to appreciate all they have done for them; 30 per cent want their children to become parents so they will realize that their own parents weren't so bad after all; 22 per cent want their children to give them grandchildren, and 17 per cent want their children to support them in their old age.

THE PARADOX OF HOPE

"Big Brothers Big Sisters is in the business of potential and possibilities yet these findings seem to go against that notion," said Bruce MacDonald, president and CEO of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC). "One telling aspect in the research is that parents have so many hopes for their kids that it can be overwhelming for both parents and children."

THE POWER OF MENTORING

Among parents who, themselves, identify as not having achieved the hopes their parents had for them, two-thirds (67 per cent) 'agree' (18 per cent strongly/49 per cent somewhat) that the advice and guidance of an adult mentor would have helped them better meet the aspirations of their parents.

METHODOLOGY

These are some of the findings of poll conducted between January 2nd to 7th, 2014 on behalf of Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada. For this survey, a sample of 1,012 Canadian parents with children in the household was interviewed via Ipsos' Canadian online panel. Weighting was then employed to balance demographics to ensure that the sample's composition reflects that of the adult population according to Census data and to provide results intended to approximate the sample universe. The precision of Ipsos online polls is measured using a credibility interval. In this case, the poll is accurate to within +/- 3.5 percentage points had Canadian adults in the general population been surveyed. All sample surveys and polls may be subject to other sources of error, including, but not limited to coverage error, and measurement error.

BOWL FOR KIDS SAKE

The Ipsos Reid survey was commissioned by Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada (BBBSC) and Invesco Canada Ltd to determine Canadians' expectations and aspirations for their children when they reach adulthood. The survey helps mark National Bowl for Kids Sake. People and businesses can support local mentoring programs by donating to the Bowl for Kids Sake campaign or volunteering to fundraise.

ABOUT BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF CANADA

BBBSC provides quality mentoring services for more than 33,000 children and teenagers. The community-based youth mentoring organization currently has over 25,000 volunteer mentors working at 123 agencies that serve children in over 1,000 communities across the country. Learn more. Visit www.bigbrothersbigsisters.ca.

ABOUT INVESCO CANADA LTD.

Invesco Canada Ltd., operating under three distinct yet complementary product brands (Trimark, Invesco and PowerShares), is one of Canada's leading investment management companies. A subsidiary of Invesco Ltd., Invesco Canada's singular focus is on investment management, offering a diversified suite of solutions to institutions, organizations, companies and individual investors across Canada and around the world. Additional information is available at www.invesco.ca

To view the videos associated with this press release, please visit the following links:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zrznt51qc8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lf5Mdetu-1U

http://www.bbbsc.ca/brandcentre/video/NationalConventionFootage/2012/Partner_Luncheon%202012_Colette.mp4 (Caption: Mother, Colette, talks about what having a Big has meant for her and her son)

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