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IT Pros Not Big Fans of Streaming March Madness Basketball Games, or Brackets

A recent survey of more than 100 IT professionals, conducted by Ipswitch, revealed the impact on IT networks caused by traffic spikes related to the popular annual NCAA basketball tournament. Well more than half (57 percent) of all respondents reported that employees streaming March Madness video coverage during business hours affected network performance.

Planning Ahead for the Madness

In anticipation of this year’s three-week long tournament, more than 44 percent of all respondents had a plan in place to deal high demands on network bandwidth. Close to 45 percent of all respondents blocked certain websites, while nearly 39 percent monitored bandwidth usage by device or user. Additionally, almost 34 percent of all respondents monitored sites being visited, 31 percent set thresholds for bandwidth use, while 24 percent shared policy prior to the event. Nearly 16 percent went the distance to help create a dedicated space for employees to watch the games.

BYOD plays big into network problems

When asked what types of devices workers use to stream video to watch events like March Madness, company-provided computers (83 percent) ranked the highest, followed closely by smartphones (77 percent). Tablets (55 percent) and personally-owned laptops (46 percent) rounded out the rest of the pack. The findings indicate that the BYOD movement plays strongly into network performance problems caused by popular events.

Brackets are as unpopular as the event itself

More than 62 percent of all IT professionals polled did not have a bracket through an NCAA March Madness pool, nearly 21 percent had one but had already been eliminated, and the remaining 17 percent were off to the Sweet Sixteen. Ipswitch created its own March Madness bracket with a network management spin to explore problems that make IT pros jump through hoops. More about our journey from the sour sixteen to the top issue that can cut down the net(work) can be found here: http://bit.ly/1sj9hkW.

“Those responsible for keeping networks running smoothly may not be as enamored with March Madness as others – and for good reason. Spikes in network traffic can lower productivity and the moods of those trying to do their jobs,” says Ennio Carboni, executive vice president, customer solution, Ipswitch. “There’s no need for IT pros to go into overtime. They should be able to easily gain visibility into who is using more than their share of bandwidth, and isolate issues before they spin out of control.”

Survey methodology and full report

The Ipswitch March Madness survey was taken by 102 IT network professionals across the U.S. between March 26 and March 31, 2014. For full survey findings visit http://bit.ly/1swgvly.

About Ipswitch

Ipswitch helps solve complex IT problems with simple solutions. The company’s software is trusted by millions of people worldwide to transfer files between systems, business partners and customers; and to monitor networks, applications and servers. Ipswitch was founded in 1991 and is based in Lexington, Massachusetts with offices throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia. For more information, visit www.ipswitch.com.

Ipswitch is a registered trademark of Ipswitch, Inc. in the U.S. and other countries.

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