SYS-CON MEDIA Authors: Jason Bloomberg, Eric Brown, Bob Gourley, Sandi Mappic, RealWire News Distribution

News Feed Item

Apps of the Future -- Matt Argall Is Exploring Artificial Intelligence Apps

MIAMI, FL -- (Marketwired) -- 05/28/14 -- Ready, stead, go -- the race is on! Leading tech companies such as Facebook, Google and Microsoft are hurrying to employ top scientists to develop artificial intelligence apps that make computers think more like people. And while we are still a far cry from life-like operating systems like "Samantha" as recently voiced by actress Scarlett Johansson in the award-winning movie "Her," there is an undeniable trend towards more intuitive applications. Even today, artificial intelligence programs are already able to recognize human speech and images. It is only a matter of time until programs learn how to handle more complex tasks and challenges.

Major industry leaders are not the only ones looking into speeding up the development in the field of artificial intelligence. A number of smaller companies and investors are also exploring the vast opportunities that come with every invention that is made with regards to digital assistant programs and applications, amongst them Matt Argall, a hugely successful entrepreneur from Miami. "Computers, mobile devices and apps have become more and more intuitive over the last couple of years," explains Argall. "But this is not the end of it. While our devices currently understand easily what we want, the next step will be for them to know what we need before we are even aware of it ourselves."

The general approach to achieving this goal is to learn as much about the user as possible, in order to enable the app to be of true assistance. "The possibilities and fields of application in which cognitive technology can be used are boundless. A well-designed app could be able to give you personalized fitness tips as well as career advice," says Matt Argall. And while he is aware of the development efforts of Microsoft, Google and the like, he is optimistic that smaller companies have equally good, if not better chances to come up with the next big thing. "Smaller businesses are often faster when it comes to developing something new, because they are not slowed down by corporate policies and red tape. They tend to have a higher level of motivation and are bolder when it comes to trying new things. In my experience that is a pretty good formula for success."

Matt Argall speaks from experience: Starting his first business adventure by saving a struggling tech company when he was only 17 years old, Matt can now look back at almost 20 years of successful business launches and savvy investments that brought him a reputation as an outstanding entrepreneur and sought-after advisor. Matt is passionate about exploring new industries and is always on the lookout for new opportunities and innovative ideas. He has already gained extensive experience in a wide variety of different sectors, from online retail to telecommunications, from high-tech water filtration systems to the music biz. In his spare time, Matt enjoys spending time with his family and is a very engaged philanthropist. He supports local causes as well as international organizations that help young start-ups in developing countries to found and run successful small businesses.

To learn more about Matt Argall, visit http://www.MattArgallNews.com

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/matt_argall

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Matt-Argall/323183061170502

Image Available: http://www2.marketwire.com/mw/frame_mw?attachid=2601737

Contact Information
PR Agency Contact:
ICMediaDirect.com
TEL: 1.800.595.0821
www.ICMediaDirect.com

More Stories By Marketwired .

Copyright © 2009 Marketwired. All rights reserved. All the news releases provided by Marketwired are copyrighted. Any forms of copying other than an individual user's personal reference without express written permission is prohibited. Further distribution of these materials is strictly forbidden, including but not limited to, posting, emailing, faxing, archiving in a public database, redistributing via a computer network or in a printed form.